Tag Archives: story of stuff series

Story of Stuff

[NOTES ON] “The Story of Change”

I’m watching the entire Story of Stuff series.  Let’s watch it together, or check out my notes on all the videos, here.  Thanks – h!

Notes I took on this video:

  • Voting with your dollar Real change is demanding solutions that work.
  • They studied movements of the past that were successful in creating change.
  • 3 rules of changing the world:  sharing a big idea for change at the heart of the problem,  we will work together until the problem is solved, creative massive actions with all kinds of citizens.
  • Changemakers: investigators, communicators, builders, resisters, nurturers, networkers.  Take the quiz.
  • It doesn’t end at the vote; there are steps afterwards.
  • *** Watch this video if you just need a quick refresher or an upper as you’re about to take on another huge task!

After taking the quiz above, I found that I am an “investigator”…and it rings true:

Investigators like you play the crucial role of exposing both the problems we face and the solutions. Here’s how:

  • Reading, inquiring and learning constantly.
  • Researching facts questions, issues and stories thoroughly until the entire picture is clear.
  • Asking the hard questions and finding the sometimes-dark truths, even when it’s challenging and uncomfortable.

Notable Investigators who have done awesome things to find truth and change the world:

  • Sandra Steingraber

  • Rachel Carson

  • Seymour Hersh

  • James Hansen

  • Peter Gleick

Story of Stuff

[NOTES ON] “The Story of Stuff”

I’m watching the entire Story of Stuff series.  Let’s watch it together, or check out my notes on all the videos, here.  Thanks – h!

The Story of Stuff is a very simple video that everyone must watch. When RF first saw this video a few years back, we were like, “OH SNAP! HOMEGIRL IN THE BLUE BUTTON DOWN IS CORRECT!” Imagine, being able to explain the mode of production, the dangers of corpocracies, imperialism, true democracy, and the effects on communities to 1.5 million people?

Let’s be real. ”Stuff” is what got us all into debt in the first place. Gadgets, cell phone bills, and expensive meals. What struck us at RF was when homegirl said @4:46 – “And if you don’t buy, or own a lot of stuff, you don’t have value.” (Let’s return to this idea soon.)

 The most important lessons:

  • history of production since the 1950s
  • planned obsolescence & perceived obsolescence
  • local living economies
  • close loop production

Please take the time while you fold your laundry: